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High Flight...




Late Night Television Sign Off...


Reviews

Reviewer: CWO-Lister - - January 18, 2014
Subject: Service to His Fellow Pilots
John Gillespie Magee, Jr. (9 June 1922 – 11 December 1941) was an American aviator (American father - British Mother) and poet who died as a result of a mid-air collision over Lincolnshire, UK during World War II. He was serving in the Royal Canadian Air Force, which he joined before the US officially entered the war.

He started "High Flight" on 18 August 1941, just a few months before his death. In his seventh flight in a Spitfire Mk I he had flown up to 33,000 feet. As he orbited and climbed upward, he was struck by words he had read in another poem — "To touch the face of God." He completed his verse soon after landing.

Magee enclosed the poem on the back of a letter to his parents. His father, then curate of Saint John's Episcopal Church in Washington, DC, reprinted it in church publications and from there it was picked up by many other publications especially following the John's Death.

There is not a pilot alive who has not heard/read this poem. It answers, "Why do you fly?" when we haven't the words.
Reviewer: therrick - - May 24, 2012
Subject: Almost brought me to tears
When I was young but old enough to stay up late, I used to stay up late just to see and hear this clip when a local TV station went off the air. I did this many nights until I had memorized the poem. There was no Internet then and I had no other way to find the text of this poem then. Seeing and hearing this clip after over 40 years almost brought me to tears. It was, and is, my favorite poem and I quote it to myself often. This poem inspired me to an interest in flying and the space program. Unfortunately, I never did...and regret it even now when I hear this again. Thanks.
Reviewer: 167656 - - August 8, 2009
Subject: I Remember!
This ran on WTOP TV-9 in Washington, D.C. and it was followed by another film that I'd love to see even more, it was "Meditations" a soothing theme with scenes of rolling waves and surf. Anyone else remember that? Love to find it here someday.
Reviewer: cosmicola - - August 7, 2009
Subject: Beautiful
One of the best (and shortest) items on the entire Internet Archive is this short film that so many of us saw late at night on TV in the 60s and 70s, just before signoff, and usually followed by the national anthem, a test pattern, and the snowy noise of no more broadcast signal. The fine aviators amongst my family and best friends love this film.
Reviewer: drpsionic - - August 7, 2009
Subject: beautiful
and every small boy seeing that imagined himself in that cockpit.
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